VII. Maneuvering – A Keen Spirit

Sun Tzu said: 28. Now a soldier’s spirit is keenest in the morning; by noonday it has begun to flag; and in the evening, his mind is bent only on returning to camp. 29. A clever general, therefore, avoids an army when its spirit is keen, but attacks it when it is sluggish and inclined to return.  This is the art of studying moods. 30. Disciplined and calm, to await the appearance of disorder and hubbub amongst the enemy:–this is the art of retaining self-possession.

In business: 28. Now an employee’s spirit is keenest in the morning; by noonday it has begun to flag; and in the evening, his mind is bent only on returning home. 29. A clever business leader, therefore, avoids a competing team or negotiation counterpart when its spirit is keen, but attacks it when it is sluggish and inclined to return. This is the art of studying moods. 30. Disciplined and calm, to await the appearance of disorder and commotion amongst the competitor – this is the art of retaining self-possession.

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